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Summer's a-comin'

Date posted: 04 November 2016

Summer plantings

The warmer weather means it’s time to plant our summer produce. We’re very excited to finally start planting our tomatoes, pumpkins and zucchinis. We’re looking forward to a bountiful garden in a few months’ time.

If you’re thinking of planting something to harvest by the end of Term 4, try growing quick-growing plants like radish, lettuce, or Asian greens.

Hoverflies, ladybirds and butterflies

With warmer days, our garden's starting to teem with insect life. We’ve been seeing heaps of butterflies, ladybirds and hoverflies. Ladybirds and hoverflies are some of our favourite visitors because they eat aphids (a pesky pest in the garden!). If you want to encourage ladybirds to your garden, try letting plants from the parsley family: coriander, dill, celery, fennel and carrots go to seed. The ladybirds often lay their eggs in the tiny flowers.

A word from Joe the Scarecrow

It is getting sunnier and warmer in the garden. Many insects are visiting our garden. There are lots of bees, butterflies and hoverflies. Hoverflies look like very skinny bees. They pollinate our plants and they eat aphids. Aphids are tiny little bugs that suck sap from plants. Ladybirds also eat aphids.

It’s time to plant tomatoes! I love eating tomatoes. I eat them in my salads and my sandwiches. Sometimes I eat a slice of tomato with a piece of cheese. If you plant tomatoes, plant basil and marigolds with them. The basil and marigolds will help to keep the bugs away.

Enjoy the sunshine and happy gardening.

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