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TACHE students return to the Nursery

Date posted: 01 July 2014

Recently students studying Certificate III in Horticulture with The Australian Centre of Horticultural Excellence (TACHE) returned to the Nursery to complete the propagation requirements of their course. Six weeks prior the students spent several weeks in the Nursery carrying out practical and theoretical work in all areas of propagation. This time they were back to examine their work, evaluate their successes and failures, and learn from their experiences.

The first task for the students was to check their seed sowings and see what had germinated. All of the plants were doing well and were ready to be planted into individual pots. The native Paper daisy (Xerochrysum bracteatum) was the first to be sowed and students had to be diligent with separating and labelling as there were two very distinct forms of the species being potted.

Another successful germination was Poppy seedlings (Papaver cv’s) which were selected from a double purple flower that had been collected previously. These plants were separated out into pots by the students. More than 1,200 potted Poppy plants are now flourishing in the Nursery!

The students also evaluated their vegetative propagations with the Ruellia spectablis. Both tip cuttings and nodal cuttings had been experimented with. Evaluation of the two propagation methods showed that both had a 100% strike rate, although it appeared the tip cuttings had larger vegetative growth and root system.

It was a great day’s work and the students enjoyed completing the projects they started earlier in the year. It’s always exciting to see the results and magic of plant propagation!

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