Sorry, your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly.

Microsoft no longer supports Internet Explorer. Please download their replacement Edge or another modern browser such as Chrome, Safari or Firefox. This site will not be fully functional using Internet Explorer.

Preparing the City Crop

Date posted: 14 October 2014

We hope you’ll join us in Adelaide Botanic Garden on 26 October to help plant our City Corn Crop. Make sure you book your place. Places are limited, don’t miss out!
Thanks to all who visited our City Crop stall at the Royal Adelaide Show, check out the image gallery on the right for all the information you need to complete your corn poster.

Preparation underway

There’s plenty of work happening in Adelaide Botanic Garden to prepare the City Crop for planting day.

With less than two weeks to go the horticultural team has been hard at work behind the scenes getting the site ready for 1,200 True Gold corn seeds.

So far the team has –

Rotary hoed the site
Applied organic fertiliser to the soil to ensure the corn will have adequate nutrients to grow
Marked out the rows for planting
Cleared pathways around the edges of the crop
Installed irrigation on the site
Installed netting to protect the crop

The City Crop site


The City Crop is 425 square metres. A lot of planning has gone into making it accessible for our City Corn Crop farmers and ideal for growing yummy sweet corn.

Protecting our City Crop


Not only will our farmers plant the City Crop they will also help us to protect it by building scarecrows to watch over the corn.

On planting day you will have the opportunity to build a mini scarecrow of your own and learn how to make a big version for your backyard.

We look forward to seeing our farmers on Sunday, 26 October to help plant the City Crop. If you want to get involved make sure you book your place.

Recent posts

Saving Plants on Kangaroo Island – winter 2021 update

03 September 2021

Following the devastating 2020 bushfires on Kangaroo Island, scientists at the SA Seed Conservation Centre have visited the island a number of times to investigate what botanical treasures have regrown, and to collect seeds and plant specimens with a conservation aim.