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And the winner is...

Date posted: 13 April 2016

A stunning yellow-and-pink Hybrid Tea rose from France took out last week's (9-10 April) 2016 National Rose Trial Garden People's Choice Weekend, after amassing more than half the votes!

The winning rose, which was marked number 24 during the event, was bred by Roses Guillot in France and submitted by local agent Knight's Roses of Gawler. It garnered a whopping 698 votes out of 1,204, in what was the biggest voter turnout ever for the event.

The National Rose Trial Garden, located within Adelaide Botanic Garden's International Rose Garden, grows only new varieties of roses that aren't currently available for sale in Australia.

The Trial Garden is used to assess if the roses are suitable for growing in our climate, soil, etc. and this helps develop and promote Australian rose breeding, plus allows valuable feedback from you - the public. If the roses are successful, they may be put forward for commercial sale.

Each year the People's Choice Weekend calls on the public to have their say on which is the prettiest of them all, and in 2016 there was no doubting the French rose's popularity. The visitor who picks the winning sequence of roses also goes home with a massive gardening prize pack.

If you missed the event, never fear - you can still see the roses, including the winner (in bed 126), at the National Rose Trial Garden until July.

Official judging won't be announced until spring.

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