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National Rose Trial Garden public judging is back in 2013

National Rose Trial Garden public judging is back in 2013

Date posted: 22 March 2013

The National Rose Trial Garden public judging is back in 2013 and will be held on 27-28 April from 10am - 4pm.

Members of the general public are encouraged to visit the Trial Gardens to cast their votes for their favourite roses and view new roses most likely to be released in coming seasons. These results provide an excellent insight for rose breeders, rose growers and retailers as to those types of roses which are most popular to the public.

If you select the top 5 most popular roses within the Trial Garden as voted by the public you could be in with a chance to win a $1000 prize pack.

The 2013 National Rose Trial Garden award winners will be listed on the National Rose Trial Garden website later this year.

International Rose Garden Conducted Tours will also be held both Saturday and Sunday at 2pm.

Started in 1996, the Garden was established to help the rose industry determine which roses not yet for sale in Australia are best suited to our climate. The Garden is the first of its kind in the country and is a joint venture between the Botanic Gardens of Adelaide, the National Rose Society of Australia and the rose industry.

The National Rose Trial Garden of Australia is located in the north-east corner of Adelaide Botanic Garden, close to the Conservatory Gate.

For more information on the National Rose Trial Garden, please visit their website.

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