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Composting: Converting waste to fertiliser naturally

Composting: Converting waste to fertiliser naturally

Date posted: 03 June 2014

Declare war on waste and learn how to create your own natural fertiliser at the Botanic Gardens of Adelaide Composting: Converting Waste to Fertiliser Naturally Master Class on Sunday, 22 June.

Presented by industry expert, and Australia’s compost guru, Tim Marshall the Master Class covers all aspects of composting including processes, ingredients, tools, techniques, management and use.

“Compost can be a great tool for gardeners, but only if it’s produced and managed correctly,” Director of the Botanic Gardens of Adelaide, Stephen Forbes said.

“The composting Master Class will ensure participants understand the fundamentals and don’t end up with a dysfunctional compost heap.”

Those who attend will leave with the knowledge and skills required to produce abundant quantities of plant fertilizer and soil conditioner year round from their household and garden waste.

Composting: Converting Waste to Fertiliser Naturally is the second course in The Australian Centre of Horticultural Excellence 2014 Master Class Series, for more information about the course please visit tache.sa.edu.au or call 08 8222 9311 to book.

The Australian Centre of Horticultural Excellence is an initiative of the Botanic Gardens of Adelaide in partnership with TAFE SA. The Centre delivers high quality horticulture training through the educational expertise of TAFE SA and the horticultural knowledge and world class collections of the Botanic Gardens of Adelaide.

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